Do Air Purifiers
Kill Viruses and Bacteria?

DON’T WORRY
Take a Deep Breath
(of Purified Air)

Fortunately, air purifiers are created for this very purpose — to combat contaminants for the purpose of enhancing indoor air quality. The demand for air purifiers has surged alongside the rising severity of air pollution and of late, coronavirus concerns. While it is undeniable that air purifiers have been visibly effective through significantly improved symptoms among groups of individuals with asthma and allergy-related respiratory diseases, the question remains: do air purifiers actually filter out and even kill viruses and bacteria, as famously claimed?

Do Air Purifiers
Kill Viruses and Bacteria?

DON’T WORRY
Take a Deep Breath (of Purified Air)

Fortunately, air purifiers are created for this very purpose — to combat contaminants for the purpose of enhancing indoor air quality. The demand for air purifiers has surged alongside the rising severity of air pollution and of late, coronavirus concerns. While it is undeniable that air purifiers have been visibly effective through significantly improved symptoms among groups of individuals with asthma and allergy-related respiratory diseases, the question remains: do air purifiers actually filter out and even kill viruses and bacteria, as famously claimed?

HOW EFFECTIVE IS AN AIR PURIFIER?

To address the elephant in the room,
yes, air purifiers are capable of trapping and
even killing viruses to a certain degree.

This means that in a typical home, only a small percentage of germs in the air are trapped. Modern air purifiers now use HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters that are known to latch onto airborne pollutants and remove 99.97 per cent of particles 0.3 microns in size2. Hence, tiny particles like dust can be trapped by a HEPA filter. Besides, even though air purifiers have yet to prove whether they can protect us from viruses, it is certain that they can reduce virus particles in the air.

Since the air around us is composed of multiple things, it is not surprising that particulate pollutants have different categories according to size, but the most prominent one is PM (Particulate Matter) 2.5, as it is quite dangerous3. This is because PM 2.5 pollutants are extremely small and light, causing them to remain in the air longer. Thus, this would simultaneously increase the likelihood of being inhaled. Their minute size also enables them to bypass our bodies’ defences, penetrating deep into our lungs and circulatory system. Needless to say, anything foreign in our bodies is never good news.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS AN AIR PURIFIER?

To address the elephant in the room, yes, air purifiers are capable of trapping and even killing viruses to a certain degree.

This means that in a typical home, only a small percentage of germs in the air are trapped. Modern air purifiers now use HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters that are known to latch onto airborne pollutants and remove 99.97 per cent of particles 0.3 microns in size2. Hence, tiny particles like dust can be trapped by a HEPA filter. Besides, even though air purifiers have yet to prove whether they can protect us from viruses, it is certain that they can reduce virus particles in the air.

Since the air around us is composed of multiple things, it is not surprising that particulate pollutants have different categories according to size, but the most prominent one is PM (Particulate Matter) 2.5, as it is quite dangerous3. This is because PM 2.5 pollutants are extremely small and light, causing them to remain in the air longer. Thus, this would simultaneously increase the likelihood of being inhaled. Their minute size also enables them to bypass our bodies’ defences, penetrating deep into our lungs and circulatory system. Needless to say, anything foreign in our bodies is never good news.

PREVENTION IS ALWAYS BETTER THAN CURE

How can we prevent or at least, reduce exposure to PM 2.5? A solution cannot be found unless we get to the root of the issue. What causes this type of pollution, that is PM 2.5, is that it stems from a multitude of sources. Essentially, they are broken down into two sources — primary and secondary. The former emits the particles directly (e.g., power plants and industrial processes) whereas the latter involves the combination of different chemicals in the air (e.g., the reaction between chemicals from coal power plants and water vapour in the atmosphere and sunlight). Additionally, it is also possible for PM 2.5 particles to be produced indoors via cooking fumes and candles. Now, how do we protect ourselves from PM 2.5 indoors? Or rather, which air purifier should we choose to do this very job?

Some air purifiers come with risks. Certain air purifiers, for instance, produce ozone due to the ionisation process, and this contributes to a bad indoor environment. Consequently, this could lead to an imminent impaired lung function, an elevation of cardiac threats, and a shorter lifespan. Furthermore, plug-in air purifiers usually have a limited range, so it is important to take note that only the air in one or two rooms would be cleaned, provided that the windows and doors are closed. The size of the room also matters to determine the appropriate size of your potential air purifier. Besides, it is crucial to change the filters periodically. Lastly, if you are a light sleeper, you may want to consider an air purifier that is not noisy.

In short, an air purifier is, of course, completely optional, though an extra layer of protection is always a worthy investment in the long run. While HEPA filters are great, it is always recommended to look out for air purifiers with an Ultra PM 2.5 Filter installed because it provides a better safeguard against airborne pollutants, as well as improving the indoor air quality. Moreover, most viruses, including a common coronavirus is around 0.1 microns in diameter, which is below the particle size that HEPA filters claim to trap. A PM 2.5 filter, however, may be more effective. Air purifiers obviously cannot completely replace practising good hygiene, but it is a step closer to a more refreshing lifestyle!

Check out CUCKOO’s range of air purifiers that come complete with the Ultra PM2.5 Filter to improve your indoor air quality.

PREVENTION IS ALWAYS BETTER
THAN CURE

How can we prevent or at least, reduce exposure to PM 2.5? A solution cannot be found unless we get to the root of the issue. What causes this type of pollution, that is PM 2.5, is that it stems from a multitude of sources. Essentially, they are broken down into two sources — primary and secondary. The former emits the particles directly (e.g., power plants and industrial processes) whereas the latter involves the combination of different chemicals in the air (e.g., the reaction between chemicals from coal power plants and water vapour in the atmosphere and sunlight). Additionally, it is also possible for PM 2.5 particles to be produced indoors via cooking fumes and candles. Now, how do we protect ourselves from PM 2.5 indoors? Or rather, which air purifier should we choose to do this very job?

Some air purifiers come with risks. Certain air purifiers, for instance, produce ozone due to the ionisation process, and this contributes to a bad indoor environment. Consequently, this could lead to an imminent impaired lung function, an elevation of cardiac threats, and a shorter lifespan. Furthermore, plug-in air purifiers usually have a limited range, so it is important to take note that only the air in one or two rooms would be cleaned, provided that the windows and doors are closed. The size of the room also matters to determine the appropriate size of your potential air purifier. Besides, it is crucial to change the filters periodically. Lastly, if you are a light sleeper, you may want to consider an air purifier that is not noisy.

In short, an air purifier is, of course, completely optional, though an extra layer of protection is always a worthy investment in the long run. While HEPA filters are great, it is always recommended to look out for air purifiers with an Ultra PM 2.5 Filter installed because it provides a better safeguard against airborne pollutants, as well as improving the indoor air quality. Moreover, most viruses, including a common coronavirus is around 0.1 microns in diameter, which is below the particle size that HEPA filters claim to trap. A PM 2.5 filter, however, may be more effective. Air purifiers obviously cannot completely replace practising good hygiene, but it is a step closer to a more refreshing lifestyle!

Check out CUCKOO’s range of air purifiers that come complete with the Ultra PM2.5 Filter to improve your indoor air quality.

Sources:
1. https://www.who.int/news-room/commentaries/detail/transmission-of-sars-cov-2-implications-for-infection-prevention-precautions
2. https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/what-hepa-filter-1
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740125/

Sources:
1. https://www.who.int/news-room/commentaries/detail/transmission-of-sars-cov-2-implications-for-infection-prevention-precautions
2. https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/what-hepa-filter-1
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740125/

Easy to carry, hard on pollutants. The CUCKOO K Model is a lightwei...
PLASMA IONISER AIR PURIFIER Designed to offer optimum air ci...
BREATHE BIG Intelligently built to offer 360° purified air ...
Malaysia’s 1st cordless air purifier with periodic service ...
Malaysia’s 1st air purifier + humidifier with periodic service...